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This is a place for both creative buyers and writers of marketing communications to share positive insights about the profession. It is hoped that peer empathy will be keenly felt by all who visit and participate* here.  



Writing Commentary I

Is there room for extra extraordinary language in marketing copy?

Is it worth it, or is it not worth the extra effort that a reader must expend to understand the message? Is the extra effort that a copywriter devotes to composing an extra special message really appreciated? Of course, the movie "Shakespeare in Love" was a huge success, in large part because the endearing dialogue's style fit the situation. So the answers, as they relate to marketing endeavor, may depend on the pomp, circumstance and degree of excellence with which extraordinary language and the balance of the concept are executed. Here, for example, is a test case scenario from me to you. It is an impassioned Shakespearean sounding plea to the marketing community for more creativity, courage and faith in what is becoming a very sophisticated consumer audience:

    Tis true creativity or niavite of message purpose that thou seeketh? One tis memorable as the sun and shines forevermore. The other, oh Lord the others are either confused or heartlessly clear. Without compliment or credit given that the audience has the mind or the spirit to be touched in a special way.

    Truly the creative design tis the way. Tis rendered perfectly always out of love for the inspired right thinking of a compelling message. Out of love for the leap of faith that allows that others also are keen and witted and most capable indeed of grasping the sublime beauty of the brave purveyor's intent. And more, sweet credibility ensues, carrying one and all involved to rapturous new heights longing breathlessly for  more.

    Like a cold slap in the face tis the "today only" kind of prod. Those there in that mindset, making that stuff, are like in kind to lost souls, unable to pique the desire to connect again. Much less find the time for honest, much less wonderous execution. So dear friend, be not afraid as tis not life or death ye must choose here, niether poison nor nectar. Just think before acting for a time. Put thineself in the shoe of the other who will see for sure thine message fine or foul as thou's intent.

While this isn't ad copy, it does exemplify that in some situations an unexpected  style of language could be as striking as an unusual illustrative or photographic offering.That when faced with a clean canvas, a promising product and the freedom of a brand new ad campaign, certainly there's room to at least consider the myriad of inventive word combinations that just aren't explored very often in a marketing scenerio.

Remember the poets, the song writers, Shakespeare, Dr.Seuss and all the rest who dare to explore the remotest areas of speech to discover wonderous phraseology for extra meaningful results! Could be it's time for the extremely gifted commercial writers of this age to trip the light fantastic more, now and again.
­commentary by Andy Attiliis



Writing Commentary II

The process.

No one ever came out and emphasized it, but after a few creative sessions I realized that background materials presented by the creative director or account executive were worth my complete attention. The odds that one of my ideas would fly were much greater if it were based on pertinent information rather than what I felt like doing that day. Even with this realization proven beyond a doubt, it would have been helpful to tattoo such truth upon my arm. Because, in reality, maintaining one's creative spirit while getting in the mood to write on someone else's behalf doesn't come naturally. For me, it requires more than a little reflection to remember the magic feeling that works everytime...willingness. Once I've let myself become totally willing to get caught up in the focused research of others, the process can begin. Out of myself, into the work, it's not long before good, supportable ideas spring forth enthusiastically.

With the value of willingness now recognized, it seemed worthwhile to outline an entire routine. Such a mind set might enhance creativity, discipline and efficiency throughout the entire process. Once again, this is the kind of simple, common sense thing that is seldom spelled out. Only after a good bit of floundering does it hit home that a thoughtful plan could improve performance. For what it's worth, here's the general approach I bring to the table:

Absorb the materials supplied by the creative director and/or project originator.  Work with the creative director and art director to help develop a compelling and informative creative concept. Participate in the initial conceptual phase by submitting thumbnail** layouts as new ideas come to mind. Choose the style of writing that will best enhance the creative direction. Provide draft copy to establish content, organization and style. Polish the finished copy to enhance clarity, speed and richness of message.

**These initial rough concepts facilitate the creative process in a variety of ways. Quick to do and easy to understand, they distill the idea into the simplest of forms so that its merit, or lack thereof, is very clear. Sometimes, after a great deal of creative exploration, that first thumbnail turns out to be the very best solution.
­commentary by Andy Attiliis



Writing Commentary III

Multi-experienced creative output can be satisfying and efficient.

Graphic designers who become adept at adding words to visual concepts often take on writing and creative direction responsibilities, too. And so it has been for me. Where to draw my line was the question. The answer came with experience which defined the kinds of writing that I could successfully accomplish without jepordizing my creative comfort zone. In other words, without becoming fearful. Fear of not meeting a deadline or not being able to come up with a unique approach is a creative's worse nightmare. As it turned out, short copy messages fit the most productively into my range of abilities. Making print ads, posters, direct mail and storyboard concepts the kinds of projects I'm able to concept, write and design at the same time.

"At the same time!?", you ask. "Much of the time", say I. My experience has been that it is not unusual to solve one aspect of a job while working on another. A headline improvement, for example, has come to mind while mixing colors. I'm frequently able to address and solve multiple creative issues with a client in a single phone session. An illustration style is sometimes inspired by the act of writing copy. Understandably, this can be a very efficient and satisfying way to work. Not for everyone, but great for those who really enjoy crafting as much of the project as possible.
­commentary by Andy Attiliis

 

*For those who have writings about writing that they would like to contribute for unlimited use, please e-mail them to aattiliis@cox.net If accepted for publication, in return for their use, contact information and a credit that is linked to your Web site will be included.


Except where otherwise indicated, all writing and creative functions displayed on this site are by Andy Attiliis.
Creative functions is a listing that highlights specific work performed on each sample.
All information found in this portfolio should be considered individual views based on the work experience of its author.

Copyright 2001 Andy Attiliis

 



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